Silence (2017): Short / Drama

Silence

The impending apocalypse finds a mother and her autistic daughter spending their last moments together.

Silence is one of these short films that you watch and the first question that comes to your mind is: “What is happening?”. Upon establishing that, the question that follows is: “Why is this happening?” The answer to that lies in the hands of the filmmakers and their effort to get the funding they need to turn it into a feature. Official selection at the Los Angeles Film Festival, so I keep my fingers crossed to be seen by the right people who can add a solid setup and confrontation. Something along the lines of Knowing (2009)?

While discontinuous editing has proved to be innovative and effective in the past – see Breathless (1960) – in Silence this is not the case. I believe though that the strong message, the impressive photography (observe the changes as the doom is nearing), and the great performances by both Louise Rhian Poole and Riann Mutlow will win the impressions and writer Rachael Howard, director Lee Burgess, and producer John Ninnis will come out of the festival with a signed deal that will answer the “why”. You can watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16Gwlb2-gw0

Stay safe!

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Mohamed (2001): Short / Drama

Mohamed

In an attempt to save his life, a man enters an apartment building only to realise that his problems will only get worse.

First critical success for the – back then – young student, and writer/director Sergi Rubió who, despite the film’s little flaws, manages to clearly convey his message. It could be an excellent third act about a young man who has struggled his whole life because… he just looks different than the majority of the people around him. About a man who has so much love to give and no one to give it to. Unfortunately, there is so much hatred to get and everyone to get it from. You can watch it here: https://www.reelhouse.org/tropicanofilms/mohamed/4743014

Because some look like you or sound like you or have the same religion as you, it doesn’t mean that everyone else will or has to. No one can claim this world. We might be part of it, but it’s not ours. All of us can equally be a scourge on this planet or a blessing. Choose the latter. Mohamed did.

Stay safe!

A Case of You (2005): Short / Drama

A Case of You

A man’s mind is playing tricks regarding when and how his relationship took a turn for the worse.

Did you ever wake up one day asking yourself, “what happened”? Struggling to put together the where, who, why, what, and when? A Case of You is exactly that! John wakes up in his apartment one morning and, in real time, he wanders from room to room trying to figure out what went wrong between him and Emily. Why he is alone. What happened.

The one 18-minute shot is impressive. It takes a huge amount of preparation in preproduction where EVERYONE in front and behind the camera gets to know EXACTLY what they need to do when filming starts. The beauty though in Jack Davie’s creation is the marriage of his directing and writing which provides practical answers and raises existential questions. No spoonfed drama here. The mind works in mysterious and, more often than not, incomprehensible ways. Try to keep track of how John and Emily’s relationship deteriorated. It’s a non-linear jigsaw and every event, every utterance, and every action is part of it.

A standing ovation for writer/director Davies, actors Jamie Draven and Julia Hickman, and every member of the crew who made this film possible. You can watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wxTj8ZBUEo

Stay safe!

Mummy Fell Asleep (2009): Short / Thriller

Mummy Fell Asleep

A mother and her little girl go on a picnic but the past resurfaces, bringing nothing but pain.

Vague yet intriguing development from writer/director John Ninnis whose inciting incident in the first act stealthily forewarns about the second act’s conflict and intensifies the denouement’s mystery. Mummy Fell Asleep falls under the category of shorts where filmmakers purely rely on solid script and acting as money is not an option. And in this case, both pay off. Ninnis’ narrative is a reminder of Sean Ellis’ intriguing first shorts – and brilliant later features. Speaking of, imagine a feature version where characters are fully developed and you get to know the preexistent, obscure events that lead to breaking the camel’s back.  Proud winner of:

  • The 2010 Heart of England Film Festival: Best Short film Internationally
  • The Irish International Film Festival: Best Short Film under 10 mins

You can watch it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2f_EpTPexqg

Stay safe!

The Art of My Scars (2016): Documentary / Short

The Art of My Scars

The chronicle of a girl who decided to become a transgender man and learned to express himself and overcome his tribulations through art.

Show me a person who claims they have no skeletons in their closet and I’ll show you a liar.

Writer/director James Land follows his fellow Devonian Kay Jane Browning who got mocked, bullied, and beaten up as a little girl only to grow up a proud young man who transcended both genders’ limitations, and became a person of his own; an artist.

It doesn’t take money to tell your story. It takes to be truthful to it. It takes to say it out loud to feel liberated. Let haters laugh at you, among others, they are only shameful, dishonest, and deceiptive. Because the rest of the world will follow you, engage with you, and give you a standing ovation for who you really are. Hats off to both James and Kay for bringing this story to the surface. You can find it here: https://www.facebook.com/TheArtofMyScars/

Watching Kay’s story, I couldn’t help but wonder, is it our generation who’s gonna put an end to discrimination? Against people who just look different than we are. Against people who are physically and/or mentally attracted to whoever they choose to? Against people who just happen to believe in something different than we do? Is it gonna be us who’s gonna make this world welcome to EVERYONE?

Show me a person who found the courage and strength to reveal their skeletons in their closet and I’ll show you a hero.

Stay safe!

 

The Last Fare (2020): Short / Drama

The Last Fare

An angry taxi driver’s last fare will make him reevaluate his own life.

Camera over the shoulder and off to a tour around the city… just until sunset. Directorial debut for Anil Bajaj who pens the script alongside Jeff Etheridge, sits on the director’s chair, and jumps straight to his cab to give one last fare. Low budget existential drama, anchored in the essence of time, surrounded by the concepts of respect, understanding, appreciation, and the importance of knowing where we stand in this world. Surely, with a bit of extra funding, Bajaj would have unfolded a longer ride, and I for one would love to watch what could have been the denouement of a feature film, fully unfolding Sonny’s rage and frustration, hoping to lead to catharsis (watch and see for yourselves).

The mise-en-scène is meticulous and the editing carefully controls the pace and rhythm. Selectively, the piano accompanies and emotionally invests in the narrative, without dictating how the audience should feel. Last but definitely not least, Sherri Eakin becomes the relatable heroine and personification of loneliness that puts us in Maggie’s shoes, reassessing all the could haves, the should haves, and would haves of our life.

Become the omniscient passenger and take the ride with them. After all, as Ithaca teaches us, it is rather the journey that matters and not the destination.

Stay safe!

Ostinato (2019): Short / Horror

Ostinato.jpg

A chef finds himself getting killed over and over by anyone he knows.

Completed through the 48 Hour Film Project in Shanghai, and winner of GOLD BEST MICROSHORT, SILVER BEST HORROR SHORT, SILVER BEST DARK COMEDY at the OCTOBER 2019 edition of Independent Shorts Awards (ISA), Ostinato marks the narrative debut for Luke Luoh. As I point out in most of my reviews, the intentions of the film are what I am always aiming at and Ostinato, even though it knows exactly where it stands, it doesn’t disclose its intentions from the start. Sets off as a comedy/horror, ostensibly, with the sole purpose of entertaining you but towards the end of Act II, it gets your mind to start thinking in reverse.

From a narrative point of view, Luoh follows the paradigmatic narration – each segment introduces a new story, location, character, etc. So, it can be viewed as short films within the short film, with every story having a beginning, a middle, and an end. The way editing contributes to this narration enhancement is by making the sum bigger than its parts. Something that you will eventually get at the film’s second plot point – the bridge between Act II and III. Be it as it may, this cerebral film wouldn’t be the same if all actors and especially the Makeup and the Special Effects Makeup artists wouldn’t have done the AWESOME job they did. Last but not least, pay attention to Kaunas’ photography and his interesting choice of “red”.

Leaving no one out, all cast and crew deserve a round of applause for the film’s final cut. If you are not adept at music terminology or just happen not to know what the title means, watch the film first and only then ask yourselves, how many times can one die? Well, in this case, as many times as one can…

Blue Mountain (2019): Drama / Romance / Short

Blue Mountain.png

A woman lies in bed watching the love of her life sleeping and can’t help but wonder if life is how she perceives it to be.

Watching Blue Mountain you stop debating with yourself regarding whether a short film can convey the message as effectively as a feature can and start wondering if what you perceive as real is everyone’s reality or just yours. Translucent Film Studios, Congo Station Productions, and one (wo)man army Jasmine Brotzman produces, writes, acts, edits, designs, and directs life’s convolution, focusing on the antitheses of certainty and doubt, love and the perception of it, and the human mind’s complexity as it endlessly and relentlessly weaves our story’s should haves, could haves, would haves…

A proud addition to the Film Festival Circuit (www.filmfestivalcircuit.com), Blue Mountain deserves all the spotlight it can get, and so does Jasmine.

The Story of 90 Coins (2015): Short / Drama / Romance

The Story of 90 Coins.jpg

Love and aspiration battle in a young fashion designer’s head when the time comes to making the decision of her life.

If there is anything worse than something preventing you from achieving your dream, that is someone preventing you from doing so… 90 coins, in 90 days that will glue you to your seats for 9 minutes. Directorial debut for Michael Wong who hits the nail with a short drama portraying the gut-wrenching feeling of slowly losing love to an idle, utopic, pseudo-promising dream.

Brilliantly directed, edited, and acted, “The Story of 90 Coins” serves as a memory which comes and goes in waves blending two peoples’ lives the way they would like to remember them, and the way they actually were. A memory that will lead them to find eternal love or lose themselves forever.

The Tattooist (2018): Short / Horror

The Tattooist.jpg

The art of tattoo and the unprecedented darkness of the artist.

Have you ever been to an under-2-minutes short film festival? “The Tattooist” is the poster child of their accomplishment. Terror, paranoia, and unfathomable blackness are synopsised in a minute and twenty seconds of ungodly, deranged insanity.

A short film by producer, writer, and director Michael Wong that needs exploring and expanding and so hope to see it becoming a feature in the very near future.