Capone (2020): Biography / Crime / Drama

Capone

Having spent 10 years in prison, Capone gets to spend the last year of his life at his mansion, suffering from dementia and visions of a violent past.

A few people asked me to watch it and tell them what I think. Well, here it is…

There are four (4) different points that need to be looked at rather than overlooked: The most obvious is Tom Hardy who, no matter who he portrays, he portrays them with effortless artistry. So, don’t pick up the stones yet. My next point is the A-list cast who supports him equally well and poses no threat to the film whatsoever. Then, it’s the makeup. Now, here I can see that you are looking at the stones again. If I had started watching the film ten minutes into it, I would think it’s a zombie or vampire Capone. The problem escalates and climaxes with the fourth point which is the writing that is all over the place. It seems like it parodies Capone’s end, and I can understand how this can be somehow offensive even if it’s regarding a criminal like him.

Writer/editor/director Josh Trank thought it would be a good idea to combine approaches taken by David Lynch and Stanley Kubrick and portray the well-known Italian-American as if he’s walking between two worlds. In such light, a major issue becomes the main genre that officially characterises the film and, consequently, the viewers’ expectations. As someone who doesn’t know much about Capone’s last year, I didn’t see it as biographical as I didn’t see any crime either (that one shooting doesn’t count).

Trank was somehow lucky – even though that might be an inaccurate term. Should the film had a theatrical release, chances are that it would have suffered a similar or worse fate than his last film five years ago. My humble opinion is that he is a great independent director who faces a lot of issues when it comes to collaborating with major studios. Chronicle (2012) is a solid proof of that.

Stay safe!

Advertisements

The Curse of La Llorona (2019): Horror / Mystery / Thriller

The Curse of La Llorona.jpg

A mother and her two kids are haunted by a malevolent, supernatural presence that turns their lives into a fight for survival.

So… here is my review on The Nun (2018) https://kgpfilm.reviews/2018/11/27/the-nun-2018-horror-mystery-thriller/. La Llorona is not as bad. The great photography provides the viewer with an eerie atmosphere and the acting is convincing. The same major problem exists though. The messy, inundated with gimmicks and cliches story. I cannot stress enough that the script’s problems cannot be covered by visual or sound effects. In this day and age, jump scares alone don’t make a horror scarier. Only more marketable.

On one hand, I’m glad the film did well as Linda Cardellini needs and deserves that spotlight. She’s a really good actress and we need to see her in major roles more often. It was good to see Raymond Cruz in a film as well. It’s been too long. On the other hand, as long as films like that do well, the producers will keep producing them and the rest of us will run out of horrors to watch (that is, other than real-life horrors).

The Conjuring universe has turned into a bloody “borefest” that one just can’t stop snoozing. I haven’t watched Annabelle Comes Home (2019) yet so, I’ll let you know when I do.

Damn, I hope it’s better…